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            Pilot’s Bill of Rights 2 Clears Key Senate Committee

            Increase font  Decrease font Release Date:2015-12-10  Author:Elena  Views:14155
            Tips:December 12, 2015 - The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation on Wednesday passed S. 571, better known as the Pilot’s Bill of Rights 2 (PBOR2), bringing significant third-class med


            December 12, 2015 - The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation on Wednesday passed S. 571, better known as the Pilot’s Bill of Rights 2 (PBOR2), bringing significant third-class medical reform one big step closer to reality.

            “As we’ve often said, working through the legislative route is not an easy or quick task, but we are very pleased that this progress has been made and the bill now goes to the full Senate,” said TTF Chairman and CEO Jack J. Pelton. “It took long hours of work by EAA and AOPA and efforts from Sens. Jim Inhofe and Joe Manchin, their staff, and the other co-sponsors of the bill to get to that point. While all legislation goes through twists and turns, the key point is that pilots will be able to avoid the complexity and expense that is inherent in the current third-class medical certification process. We will continue our work to push this legislation forward, with the continuing support of TTF members who have made their voices heard to their elected representatives on this matter.”
            In addition to the medical exam, pilots will be required to take a free online education course on aeromedical factors every two years. The course will be designed to increase awareness and understanding of medical factors that can affect a pilot’s fitness to fly.

            Under the bill, the FAA will have a year from the date the legislation becomes law to produce a final rule reflecting the legislation’s provisions. If the final rule is not ready within one year of the bill’s enactment, pilots will be allowed to fly under the guidelines set out in the legislation without facing FAA enforcement action. The legislation also directs the FAA to streamline the special issuance medical process and identify additional medical conditions that AMEs can issue medical certificates for without requiring the pilot to go through the special issuance medical process.
            “TTF members have told us that this is their top priority for our advocacy team,” Pelton said. “Is it a perfect bill with everything that we could have wanted? Of course not. Legislation rarely is. It is, however, broad relief and reform for the vast majority of individuals who want to fly for fun and personal transportation. It is the furthest advancement ever made for this essential aeromedical reform.”
            For more information about the legislation and how it pertains to you, visit TTF’s frequently asked questions regarding third-class medical reform.




             
             

             
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